1960 Presidential Debate Revisited

I watched the debate between Obama and McCain and walked away wondering with all of McCain’s references to history he seemed to have missed one very important history lesson and that was Nixon’s shifty eyes in the 1960 presidential debate. Shifty eyes sunk Nixon in that debate, not his words and that is exactly what happened with McCain.  McCain lost the debate for that reason alone, shifty eyes.  McCain’s facial expressions alone did not inspire and screamed he is not a leader.

CNN

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About Bolshy

Blogging in the ether to see if that elusive literary agent or publisher wants some new talent.
This entry was posted in Blah!, Conservatives, Politics, Sociology and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

0 Responses to 1960 Presidential Debate Revisited

  1. dotmafia says:

    Obama clearly won. He looked and sounded like a true presidential statesman, while McCain looked old, flustered and sounded belligerent. Not once did he give Obama the respect of looking at him directly while he was being spoken to, and I believe this disrespect speaks volumes about how McCain will conduct his foreign and domestic policies: The same disrespect Bush has shown the world and the American people for the last 8 years.

  2. pp says:

    I saw only fragments of the debate when it was shown on the news here in Australia, so cannot really comment on how well either of them did. But from what I have read on different blogs tonight, I am seeing a pattern of leadership emerge in both Republican candiates.
    Anyone who disagrees with or challenges McCain gets attacked in a very aggressive belittling manner – apparently has a fearsome temper that he has difficulty controlling (e.g attacking verbally anyone even asking for info on POWs, including their families!). So this modus operandi in the debate actually comes as no surprise.
    Anyone who does not toe Sarah Palin’s line gets dealt with pretty smartly – if she can get away with it! (eg. been known to run an almost personal vendetta against anyone who does something she doesn’t like).
    Obviously both McCain & Palin subcribe to the idea of a leader being strong. What they appear to forget however, is that a leader’s strength has to be tempered with good sense, diplomacy, respect for others, a strong ethical / moral conscience etc. If these other qualities are missing, once in power, these sort of people often become ruthless & arrogant, and use their power without conscience.
    Sounds like McCain is well on the way!

  3. steve says:

    I don’t see how anyone can say anyone clearly won that debate. They both did well. But given the expectations, that Obama was going to obliterate Mccain, that Mccain didn’t clearly lose is almost a victory in itself.

  4. Irma Miller says:

    I am not surprised by McCain’s response and disrespect. Amercians had to deal with this sort of administration for 8 years. We can not take another 4 years of being undermined to destroy this country nor can we risk the chance of Palin running the country if something was to happen to McCain. We as Americans are not asleep as Republicans and the current adminstration think we are. We will take it to the poles in November.

  5. Brandon says:

    I am an independent but I find it quite unsettling and a bit disheartining that the average grades on cnn.com for the respectable candidates are a “B” and a “D”. I am sure you can guess which goes to who. this just goes to show that some Americans shouldn’t be allowed to vote. You can’t vote for a president because he looks his competetor in the eye. Obama talks a lot.. but SAYS very little. Like McCain said last night. Obama has had his chances to vote liberally and he has decided otherwise (i.e. giving oil companies $4 billion). I’m sorry to all of those Bush haters out there because I too hate G.W. but McCain is not compariable in and fasset. Like he told Obama “It’s hard to reach across the asile when you are that far to the left.” Everyone who visits this website and voted on those report cards can’t reach across the asile. So iI challenge everyone who is reading this to pretend like McCain doesn’t have the (R) next to his name. Look at him as a politician, same with Obama. Anyone who thinks any candidate clearly won (dotmafia) should lose their right to vote and be deported because any child with a brain cell can tell you it was close.. very close – just like the polls.

  6. Brandon says:

    Shifty eyes.. give me a break. THIS IS NOT THE 1960’s!!!!! wow. that was stupid.

  7. Ann says:

    McCain came across as the most experienced and dedicated because he has a long history of immersing himself in world issues and trying to change things in the gov’t. Obama came across as a rhetoric philosopher, politician, repeating and re-repeating everything we have heard over and over again, because that is what he has dedicated himself to…the politics of running for President. He couldn’t present enough facts to substantiate any past “action” he has taken to right the wrongs of our nation while John was fluent with facts and actions he has taken.
    Obama’s seemed befuddled at times and appeared to be looking for reassurance from Lehrer and/or John.
    His rebuttles were eloquent, but lacking substance, fact. He came across as an innocent, with good intentions, who is not real sure how he would accomplish his ideals. He didn’t convince me that he would know how to handle “world or economic” issues. Who would I entrust my future to? The one with more experience , resolve, courage and confidence. That person is John McCain, who I thought dominated the debate and was very successful in getting his message across.

  8. Will Rhodes says:

    Obama came across as a rhetoric philosopher, politician, repeating and re-repeating everything we have heard over and over again

    Like the bears in Montana story? Like he was a POW? Like he was in the Navy? Like he was — oh wait, you were talking about Obama.

  9. kteachums says:

    I am a 57 year old educator, single mother. My oldest child became ill with cancer when she was pregnant with my first Grandson. Did McCain address me? Obama did. He talked about early childhood education. He talked about health care for the middle class. McCain talked about winning a war. As a mother I would give Obama my son’s bracelette. He will inspire the American people to be better than what they are. I have watched him all these months. He is a great leader. I still remember the words in his acceptance speech; “This has never been about me, it’s about you”. When we are down, the thing that brings us up is hope. Senator Obama has always offered hope. With the hope will come change. Didn’t our ancestors take that chance when they traveled on a boat to this country? It is time that McCain stops putting him down and telling lies. This young leader is what this country needs to unite the races and the generations. “Yes We Can”!

  10. Toby says:

    Ann says Obama “couldn’t present enough facts to substantiate any past “action” he has taken to right the wrongs of our nation while John was fluent with facts and actions he has taken.”

    What does being a community organizer and an effective, progressive state legislator count for? Oh, I forgot, to you Rs, “community organizer” is a dirty word, and “effective” means “South Side Chicago” (code word, Black!). And McCain? Oh yeah, he thinks we need to “win” in Iraq, whatever the hell that means (protect “our” oil?), and that’s more important than “righting the wrongs of our nation” (like maybe regulating the corporate greed-heads). NOT.

    Obama is not a saint, but he sure is a heck of a lot more promising than more blind, fundamentalist, warmongering stupidity.

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